How does Louis P. Pojman argue that although moral activity does indeed serve our own better interests to some extent, not all moral acts are motivated by self-interest, or we can say that self-interest is not the sole motivation of our moral acts?

How does Louis P. Pojman argue that although moral activity does indeed serve our own better interests to some extent, not all moral acts are motivated by self-interest, or we can say that self-interest is not the sole motivation of our moral acts?

 

Solution

Let us take an example. A mother teaches a child her child to behave in a manner (which is moral) or performs an activity to set an example for her child (a moral activity) so that

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